McKinley “Mac” Anthony Drew ~ Class of 1977

McKinley Mac Drew ~ Class of 1977

Departed 7/15/2022

Mayte Drew lovingly wrote:

With our hearts heavy and grief-stricken, my oldest brother, Donnie and I bring the news of the passing of my twin brother, McKinley Anthony Drew (Mac) who was 63 years young. He has been extremely ill for several months and passed away in his sleep Friday night.

Donnie has taken care of my brother for the past 4 months and being there for my brother when no one else could. No greater love can be expressed than to be the one who takes care of you when you are sick. My brother Donnie is that selfless and generous brother who stepped up to take care of Mac. Donnie is an extraordinary man and brother who I cherish. There were 4 of us kids. Donnie being 2 years ahead of Mac and I and Jackie just 14 months younger than the twins.

As a family we traveled around the world 3 times each time consuming 3 months of intense travel. We certainly got to know each other very well through traveling. These travels lead us places that at the time only people read about those places in books.

This is a tribute to my family and my twin. He was my best friend growing up. I was his sidekick when we went outside to play Cowboys with him imagining himself as Bat Masterson or Jungle Jim in the sixties. He was the one who said “She is on my team” when the neighborhood boys said “No girls” get to play sports. He is the reason I had a happy childhood playing sports and hanging out with the guys.

In Thailand, we would play basketball, football, soccer, swam every day by ourselves with our friends in Rishi Court. In my junior high years, we would play half-court basketball almost every day with our friends in Rishi Court at the outdoor court at ISB. I watched every little league baseball game that my brother played, was scorekeeper, and participated in the practices as my Dad was the Coach of those little league teams.

For our last 2 years of college, we both went to Beirut, Lebanon attending American University of Beirut where again I got to play with boys being the only girl to pay in all male fast pitch softball league. We lived through an intense environment in Beirut and came home to the States. He later came to Texas in his mid-twenties where he lived 18 years there before his work lead him west.

We came into this world together, we played make believe together, we traveled, we played sports together and we cried together. His gift to me was the freedom to enjoy my childhood by participating in something I loved and getting to hang around the guys. This shaped my life in so many positive ways and Mac’s gift to me gave me confidence, freedom, and happiness.

I can never fully express the love and appreciation I have for my twin brother, Mac. I love him with my whole heart and soul, and I know that he has been reunited with with my beloved Mother, Juanita, Sister, Jackie, my nephew, Anthony, my Aunt Rosemary, Uncle Vern, and Cousin John. It is my fervent prayer that the Lord take care of my family in body and spirit. God bless my family.

Special prayers for my father who is 92 years old who just lost his second child and my cousin Gary.

Please send pictures (old and new), anecdotes, articles, stories, and tributes to isbeings at gmail dot com or visit us on Facebook at ISBeings

Lanny Mitchell ~ Class of 1968

Lanny Mitchell ~ Class of 1968

Departed ~ 7/15/2022

From: Pamela Mitchell Boyd pamelasboyd51 at gee mail dot com
Subject: Lanny Mitchell

Lanny attended ISB as a Jr and Sr in 1966-1968. He was the bass player in the band, Flowers. I wanted anyone who remember him to know that he passed away on Friday, 7/15/22 peacefully at home. We miss him already.

Please send pictures (old and new), anecdotes, articles, stories, and tributes to isbeings at gmail dot com or visit us on Facebook at ISBeings

Sumalee Anne Karwacki Hatchett ~ Class of 1993

Sumalee Karwacki ~ Class of 1993

Arrived ~ Dec. 17, 1974
Departed ~ Jun. 20, 2022

Sandy Simpson lovingly wrote: Thailand made us a family. There is no place our sister loved more.

Please send pictures (old and new), anecdotes, articles, stories, and tributes to isbeings at gmail dot com or visit us on Facebook at ISBeings

Bartlett “Bart” Alexander McLennan Woodward ~ Class of 1971

Bart Woodward ~ Class of 1971

Arrived ~ April 1, 1953

Departed ~ April 2, 2022

Bartlett Alexander McLennan Woodward

Obituary

A Foreign Service brat, Bart was born to Keith and Hugh Woodward in Bern, Switzerland on April 1, 1953. His childhood was spent in La Paz, Bolivia, Bonn and Bremen, Germany, and he went to high school in Bangkok, Thailand. Bart attended college at Case Western Reserve University, where he met Lisa Soule (he needed a housemate, and she answered the ad); he graduated with a double degree in Political Science and Communications.

Following graduation, Bart stayed on for a year as the Assistant to the Vice President of the University, then followed his dreams into advertising. After one too many freezing Cleveland winters, he returned to his home-between-posts of Washington, DC, where he and Lisa settled in Bethesda, MD. They were married in 1983, and their identical twins Diana and Corinne were born in 1986, followed by Ali in 1989.

Bart continued his work in advertising and communications, working for various ad agencies and production companies until going out on his own as a freelance writer and producer. He had a combined 30+ years of experience in video producing, and script writing for non-fiction promotional videos, winning numerous awards throughout his career. His clients included NASA, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, US Army, Planned Parenthood, numerous non-profit associations, government agencies, and universities.

His skills at interviewing and script writing were the hallmarks of his professional work; at home, he was an excellent listener and storyteller. He was a practical, logical thinker when it came to life advice. He taught his daughters those skills, imparting to them the confidence to be independent and to think for themselves. But he also knew how to engage with his family on an emotional level, and to offer unconditional love and support when it was most needed.

Bart couldn’t let a day go by without solving multiple Sudoku puzzles. He could also be found reading novels and listening to his favorite music in his home office. He enjoyed riding his big tire bike around Rehoboth, and loved driving his Chevrolet Camaro convertible. His dogs were his favorite passengers as they didn’t complain about the wind messing up their hair.

Bart is survived by his wife and daughters, his “terrible terriers,” and his brother Christopher.

Please send pictures (old and new), anecdotes, articles, stories, and tributes to isbeings at gmail dot com or visit us on Facebook at ISBeings

James Richard (J. R) Getches né Goetcheus ~ 1975

James Richard (J. R) Getches né Goetcheus ~ 1975

Departed ~ 4/11/22

Babette Trout Dammon lovingly wrote:

Hi David. I haven’t seen a posting for the passing of J. R. Getches (originally Goetcheus). Here is an obituary I found and also a tribute to him by The Charleston City paper. JR was a freshman when I was a senior (’72) and was in YIs.

James Richard Getches (né Goetcheus)
September 21, 1957 ~ April 11, 2022 (age 64)

Obituary
James Richard “J.R.” Getches (né Goetcheus) died on April 11, 2022, at his home in Houston, Texas. He was 64 years old. At his bedside were his wife, Christina Stewart; his mother, Martha Anders and his stepfather Ben Anders; his sisters Cyndi Goetcheus Sarfan and Susan L. Goetcheus; and his brother Scott Goetcheus.

J.R. was born in Fort Lewis, Washington on September 21, 1957. The firstborn child of an Army helicopter pilot, he traveled the world, living in Germany, on several Army bases stateside, and in Bangkok, Thailand. In Thailand in the early 70’s, J.R. played cornet in the Young Internationals, where his early love for performing first took root. But J.R.’s life was truly and forever transformed when he discovered Jimi Hendrix. Hendrix inspired J.R. to teach himself to play guitar and the rest, as they say, is history. J.R. spent endless hours during his teenage years with guitar in hand, listening to music, more often than not splayed out on the floor riffing away. From the days of his first garage band, J.R. spent the rest of his life honing his guitar skills. J.R. was a truly gifted and accomplished guitar player whose guitar acumen simply cannot be overstated. Ultimately, he became a highly respected musician, singer and songwriter who shared his talents generously and connected easily with other musicians as a collaborator as well as a mentor and teacher.

At 14, J.R. moved with his family from Bangkok to Newport News, Virginia. J.R. attended Menchville High School, where he excelled academically, played basketball and served as student body president. He graduated from Menchville in 1975. J.R. maintained relationships with many of his high school friends throughout his life.

After high school, J.R. attended the University of Virginia where he was a member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity. He studied engineering briefly before falling in love with the theater department. During his time at U.VA. he also studied in Paris, where he became (mostly) fluent in French, learned to mime (when it was actually pretty cool do so) and enjoyed earning extra money busking on the Paris streets. Upon his return to Charlottesville, J.R. continued in the theater program and was a founding member of The Motive, a local band with a strong following on campus and in the community. J.R. would go on to play with many bands and other musical groups in and around Charlottesville. J.R. graduated from U.Va. with a theater and French degree and was a proud Wahoo for all of his days.

Shortly after his college graduation and uncertain about what one does with a theater and French degree, J.R. taught himself a variety of computer programming languages. As with J.R.’s musical skills, J.R.’s computer skills opened many doors for him, ultimately taking him to London, New York City, Los Angeles, Charleston and Colorado Springs for work. Notwithstanding his gainful daytime employment, J.R. continued to pursue his musical life, playing with Native Tongue, Venus for Breakfast and other groups in New York City; with Bette Williams, Flowers and The Cages in Los Angeles; and with Smoking the Ghost, MacDaddy, Satellite Rodeo, the Louie D. Project and others in Charleston. J.R.’s musical skills took him to stages around the world, from St. Petersburg, Russia, to Las Vegas, Central America and many other locations.

A very talented and creative photographer, J.R. was known for his sweeping landscapes, beautiful nature shots and his unique ability to capture the true soul of his portrait subjects. J.R. was also a talented videographer and director, known to create compelling and moving music videos for his own bands and for other performers. For several years, J.R. was the photographer for the Charleston City Ballet, capturing dramatic images that reflected his lifelong appreciation of dance. His wonderful images were displayed in exhibits in Charleston and Houston. J.R. was also an entrepreneur, screenwriter and web designer.

J.R deeply loved all creatures great and small. He was a rescuer of birds, snakes and turtles, as well as the owner of many exotic pets throughout his lifetime. On numerous occasions, J.R. stopped his car, risking life and limb, to rescue an imperiled turtle in the road. He had a very special love for guinea pigs. J.R. was also at times an alligator wrangler and rattlesnake catcher. He was a good hearted but fierce competitor who was basically unbeatable at Scrabble and a master at the game of Balderdash. He was a lover of black leather jackets, which he donned even to join his father for a round of golf, perhaps to his father’s dismay. He was a man who not only habitually gave money to the homeless on the streets of the big cities he called home, but who did so with genuine warmth and respect for each soul he encountered. J.R. was exceptionally funny, with a wry quick wit. J.R. never forgot to send birthday greetings to his siblings nor flowers to his mother on her birthday.

In October 2021, J.R. was diagnosed with infrarenal aortic Angiosarcoma, an extremely rare and aggressive cancer. Following his diagnosis, J.R. and Christina moved to Houston to receive treatment at MD Anderson Cancer Center. Throughout his difficult cancer treatment, J.R. faced every set back and every challenge with his customary good humor and tenacity. He was incredibly kind to every person involved in his treatment, whether a doctor, nurse or cafeteria employee, always expressing his gratitude and offering his warm smile to those with whom he interacted, for whatever task was performed. When J.R.’s nurse practitioner told J.R. that he was out of treatment options and had very little time left, J.R. said to her, “May I give you a hug? I know this is very hard for you.”

The cancer that took J.R. from us was cruel and those of us who love him so very much are heartbroken by his loss. But as we remember J.R., let us also remember that he was a lucky man. He lived on his own terms. He allowed himself the time and space and freedom to pursue his passions with his whole heart and to give generously to his friends and family. In the last part of his life while in Charleston, J.R. met and married Christina. A few years later he purchased and settled into the beautiful home they both loved in Pueblo, Colorado, where they were living at the time of his diagnosis. He was so proud to be a homeowner at last.

After his diagnosis, J.R. was showered with messages of love, admiration and memories from a multitude of amazing and true friends around the world. Many of his closest friends rushed to his side and in his last days, enveloped him in beautiful music and words of love. So many people from so many places and times in his life came to his aid with their contributions and kindness. J.R was grateful for the generosity and love he received in his final months and throughout his life. He was amongst the fortunate few who left this world knowing how truly loved he is. His was a life well-lived.

J.R. is survived by his wife Christina Stewart and her daughter, Camille; his mother, Martha Bastin Anders, who deserves so much credit and admiration for the beautiful human she raised and gave to the world; his step-father John B. (Ben) Anders and step-mother Genevieve Lane; his siblings Cyndi Goetcheus Sarfan, Susan L. Goetcheus and Scott Goetcheus; his brother-in-law Richard Marshall; his step-brothers Vance Lane and his wife Suzi, Jay Anders and his wife Susie, Nicholas Anders; and his step-sister Corinne Anders; his nieces Matilda Marshall and Lucy Marshall; and his nephews Harry Marshall, Ryan Sarfan and Austin Sarfan. J.R. was predeceased by his father, Lt. Col. (ret.) James Richard Goetcheus.

Memorial Services and Celebrations of Life will be held in Charleston in May and in Raleigh in June.

The family suggests that donations in J.R.’s honor be made to any of the following organizations: The World Wildlife Fund (worldwildlife.org), the Red Wolf Coalition (redwolves.com), The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (aspca.org), The Angiosarcoma Project (cureasc.org) or any other organization that helps animals or people in need (local homeless shelters, for example).

Remembering J.R. Getches, a kind Charleston soul

by Debbie Hall
April 19, 2022

J.R. Getches | Photo courtesy of Christina Getches.

It’s not often you meet someone who manifests all that is good in human beings, but I was fortunate to meet such a person. I was connected with J.R. Getches while working on a fundraiser. He was kind enough to share his wisdom and time with somebody he’d never met and owed nothing to. I considered him a friend afterwards, but I think J.R. was a friend to everyone. J.R. was a staple of the Lowcountry Blues Society, played with various bands including The Louis D Project and MacDaddy, and was a gifted guitarist, singer and songwriter. J.R. was also well-versed in martial arts, which may have contributed to his Zen master ways.

J.R. was also a prolific photographer. He observed the divine in the ordinary. Whether his subject was human, animal or landscapes, his signature-style is exquisite, ethereal and soothing. And because J.R. didn’t do anything halfway, his art was exhibited at the Charleston City Gallery and he was a valued member of the Charleston Artist Guild.

J.R. left a distinctive and indelible mark with his artistic gifts, and he accomplished a lot, but his biggest impact was not what he did, but who he was. Have you ever met anyone that not a single soul has a negative word to say about? J.R. was that person. He was kind to every living being.

He was the guy who would stop to rescue a baby squirrel that fell out of a tree. He was the guy that found the good in everything and everyone.

DEBBIE HALL
In tributes from J.R.‘s friends, old and more recent, a consistent theme emerged: J.R. was a teacher, a student, a mentor, a friend, a collaborator, an inventor, a guide. He was patient with those who needed that and an inspiration to those who needed that. Despite any differences in politics, socioeconomics, background, race or religion, J.R. found a way to connect with everyone he met. You’re a Trumper? You’re Antifa? You’re famous? You’re homeless? You’re Muslim, Jewish, Buddhist, Christian, atheist? It didn’t matter to J.R.. He treated every sentient being with respect. He had a unique ability to not only see one’s humanity, no matter how deeply it might be buried, but to nurture it so it rose to the top. J.R. was easy to be around and made everyone a better person.

Sadly, J.R. left this dimension on April 11 after a six-month battle with epithelioid angiosarcoma. He was in so much pain that my only solace in his departure is he didn’t have to endure it for years.


Focus on J.R. Getches
A Bio of J.R. Getches, by Scott Bucholtz:

These Bio’s are supposed to be brief. J.R. Getches has a resume of experience that is anything but brief. The more I talk to him, the more I shake my head in disbelief. Who else in the Lowcountry Blues Club has played side by side with B.B. King? (he even had the opportunity to play the REAL Lucille). Who has toured Russia with Steve Vai? By the way, Steve Vai was the opening act for J.R.’s band! Who else in the blues club has been on the cover of Billboard magazine? Had his picture in Rolling Stone? Get this: he’s even had a #1 selling children’s song (check out his full length children’s’ CD “Julie the Starfish & Other Lullabies” on Amazon.com or iTunes) . Should I continue? He has composed ballet for the Princeton Ballet and the Annabelle Gonzalez Dance Theatre (which was reviewed in the NY Times). He has contributed the theme song to a PBS special. He’s recorded with a variety of groups on about a half dozen different major record labels. In addition to these exploits, he’s toured Central America, Asia and Europe. Oh yeah: He’s an accomplished photographer and he started Celebrity Wake-Up Call with The Pamela Anderson. Do I still have room for any details?

As the son of a career Army officer, he was born in Fort Lewis, Washington which was just one of the many, many posts in the U.S. and abroad. It was high school before he attended the same school two years in a row. He started playing electric guitar a week before his 13th birthday while on vacation in Penang, Malaysia. Why? He heard Jimi Hendrix ‘Band of Gypsies’ roaring out of a pirate record store. He instantly bought the album and a cassette tape and played it non-stop for several days. He received a Mosrite electric for his birthday and never stopped playing. He sat in his room with ‘Band of Gypsies’, Santana’s ‘Abraxas’, and Led Zeppelin’s first couple of records and tried to learn all the licks. Sound familiar? (with the exception of the Malaysian part!) Note: Years later, J.R. had the opportunity to hang out and also perform with Band Of Gypsies drummer Buddy Miles (on bass was none other than Stanley Jordan).

He heard about the Blues Club via word-of-mouth and dropped by a ‘Dough’ jam about two years ago. He keeps coming back because he loves the energy. He also identified what we all hope to feel: the validation that can only come from a room full of your peers. The Lowcountry Blues Club can certainly provide that.

Obviously, his influences and inspirations are Hendrix, Santana and Zeppelin (a Holy Trinity?). He also mentions Sly & The Family Stone, James Brown, ZZ Top, The Allman Brothers, Humble Pie, Mott The Hoople, Rolling Stones and Pink Floyd. When you see him play with The Louie D Project, you’ll see him utilize all of these influences. You’ll probably even be able to identify them but you will marvel at how he manages to use them to construct an original sound and style that is uniquely J.R. Getches. Today, he says his favorites are The Black Crowes, Ravi Shankar and Peter Gabriel. Ravi Shankar? I’ll bet you haven’t heard that name in a while… That might explain some of the other-worldly sounds that J.R. can create!

Currently, he has been in Charleston Sound Studios working on a full length CD of dance and party tunes (among other surprises) with the Louie D Project. He shared a rough mix of the lead track with me. It’s a super-hot track named “Don’t Take Sand To The Beach”. I can’t wait to hear the rest! He’s also writing some new children’s music projects and scoring films and videos.

Some of his favorites for jamming are ‘Comfortably Numb’ by Pink Floyd, ‘Dear Prudence’ by The Beatles, ‘My Prerogative’ by Bobbie Brown, ‘Beer Drinkers and Hell Raisers’ by ZZ Top, ‘Dreams’ by The Allman Brothers, ‘Frankenstein’ by The Edgar Winter Group. If you ask him who his favorite Blues Club jammers are, he’ll wisely say: “There are so many, but Dan Wright, Sarah Cole, and Allyson Taylor”.

His band resume includes the following: Back in Virginia: The Motive, and The Projects. In New York: Native Tongue, Venus For Breakfast, Soluble Fish, The Poppies (CBS Records), Christine Lavine (Rounder Records). In Los Angeles: Flowers, The Bette Williams Band (Euphoria Records), Humble Servants of The Groove, The Patrick Dennis Band (Curb Records). Charleston, SC: Flyin’ Blind, Mac Daddy, Partymouth, Kurt Ginsberg, Smoking The Ghost, The Bad Signs and The Louie D Project.

I highly recommend taking advantage of any opportunity to not only see/hear him play but, if possible, pick his brain. I see him as the “Yoda” of our Blues Club. He and I were recently discussing what it is like to return to performing after having been away for an extended period. We agreed on the fact that you really do appreciate it more after being away. The increase in clarity and focus is surprising.

Our discussions were reminiscent of an interview I recently read with Warren Haynes of the The Allman Brothers, “It’s cliché’ to say, but I’ve said several times and a lot of people have said the same thing; a musician can walk onstage and physically feel bad, have a temperature of 103 or something, and as soon as you walk onstage and start playing music and feeling the wave of energy, you start feeling better in a very healing way. I think music has healing properties. If you walk onstage feeling good, you’re going to feel even better. It’s pretty amazing. And again, it sounds kind of stupid to say, but I really believe in the healing power of music.” As he says: “I don’t know that I could live among people without music”.

While it’s trite, it’s true: music really is magical. To be able to say that I’ve shared a stage with J.R. is exciting. I feel like I’ve been touched by greatness. I have certainly heard and felt it. Can you think of a better prescription? I can see you shaking your head too!

This weekend you can catch J.R. with the Louie D Project downtown Saturday night at The Brick. As always, there is a plethora of great live entertainment this weekend. Shovels and Rope is at The Tin Roof Thursday night. Sarah Cole and The Hawkes are at Loggerheads on Folly Thursday and at New Moon Pizzeria & Pub on Friday. Plane Jane will be at Wild Wings in N. Charleston on Friday. Mac Leaphart will be at the Charleston Pour House Saturday. Also on Saturday, Johnny Mac and the BootyRanch will be at Jimbo’s Rock Lounge. Check out my friends in Fowler’s Mustache Sunday night at The Windjammer. Next Tuesday, you can find Shaniqua Brown open for Pile at The Tin Roof. Finally, I will be with The Mason Dixon Band at Birdie & Sharon’s in Walterboro Friday and Saturday night (Feb 18 & 19). This weekend we have special guest JoJo Wall sitting in on Harp. Come check us out!

Scott Bucholtz

Remembering J.R. Getches, a kind Charleston soul

by Debbie Hall
April 19, 2022

J.R. Getches | Photo courtesy of Christina Getches.

It’s not often you meet someone who manifests all that is good in human beings, but I was fortunate to meet such a person. I was connected with J.R. Getches while working on a fundraiser. He was kind enough to share his wisdom and time with somebody he’d never met and owed nothing to. I considered him a friend afterwards, but I think J.R. was a friend to everyone. J.R. was a staple of the Lowcountry Blues Society, played with various bands including The Louis D Project and MacDaddy, and was a gifted guitarist, singer and songwriter. J.R. was also well-versed in martial arts, which may have contributed to his Zen master ways.

J.R. was also a prolific photographer. He observed the divine in the ordinary. Whether his subject was human, animal or landscapes, his signature-style is exquisite, ethereal and soothing. And because J.R. didn’t do anything halfway, his art was exhibited at the Charleston City Gallery and he was a valued member of the Charleston Artist Guild.

J.R. left a distinctive and indelible mark with his artistic gifts, and he accomplished a lot, but his biggest impact was not what he did, but who he was. Have you ever met anyone that not a single soul has a negative word to say about? J.R. was that person. He was kind to every living being.

He was the guy who would stop to rescue a baby squirrel that fell out of a tree. He was the guy that found the good in everything and everyone.

DEBBIE HALL
In tributes from J.R.‘s friends, old and more recent, a consistent theme emerged: J.R. was a teacher, a student, a mentor, a friend, a collaborator, an inventor, a guide. He was patient with those who needed that and an inspiration to those who needed that. Despite any differences in politics, socioeconomics, background, race or religion, J.R. found a way to connect with everyone he met. You’re a Trumper? You’re Antifa? You’re famous? You’re homeless? You’re Muslim, Jewish, Buddhist, Christian, atheist? It didn’t matter to J.R.. He treated every sentient being with respect. He had a unique ability to not only see one’s humanity, no matter how deeply it might be buried, but to nurture it so it rose to the top. J.R. was easy to be around and made everyone a better person.

Sadly, J.R. left this dimension on April 11 after a six-month battle with epithelioid angiosarcoma. He was in so much pain that my only solace in his departure is he didn’t have to endure it for years.

Please send pictures (old and new), anecdotes, articles, stories, and tributes to isbeings at gmail dot com or visit us on Facebook at ISBeings

Louise Marie Spencer Lindsay ~ F-Faculty 1969 – 1974

Louise Lindsay ~ F-Faculty

Departed ~ 4/6/2022

Lovingly submitted by her son, Ken Lindsay.

Happy Mother’s Day Louise. Thanks for all your helpful guidance and good intentions.

Miss Louise (12/3/1932 — 4/6/2022)

On Wednesday evening, shortly before Easter, the nighttime caregiver telephoned to say that Miss Louise had taken her last breath and the Good Lord has called her home. Louise’s last word that I heard was “yes” when we said “you’ll probably be seeing God soon” and Louise responded immediately and clearly “yes”.

Wednesday was a good day for Louise. She had extended visits from two priests and received the last rites. The daytime caregiver sang to her and held her hand, rubbed lotion on her feet and read from The Little Prince, one of Louise’s favorite books. We talked to her several times and the last one she seemed much more at peace. Her breath was calm, not labored.

Born Louise Marie Spencer in Kansas City to Florence Bjorkman Spencer and Francis Edward Spencer, Louise was half pure Swedish and half Anglo-American mix. She grew up in the Great Depression and World War Two which led her to being a fiscal and political conservative. As the Republican party became more partisan and extreme, and abandoned traditional conservative values, Louise migrated towards the Democrats and reluctantly supported them for the last several elections in which she voted.

Louise was an extremely intelligent woman and excelled in school. She went to University of Missouri in Columbia and was a member of the Chi Omega Sorority. Her sisters sought her help with studies and school work to such an extent that apparently it attracted some disapproval from University authorities, the details of which are lost in the murky depths of time.

Louise met Bob Lindsay at a football game between Mizzou and KU (Bob’s alma mater). They fell in love immediately and were married before too long. For many years Bob carried a picture in his wallet of the two of them after a Chi Omega song and dance review, with Bob standing next to Louise looking dazzled and shy, and Louise kicking her leg high in the air, wearing a chorus line costume and a smile as big as Montana. Louise gave life to two boys, Gary (died from covid 2020) and Ken (still kicking, as Bob often said). She is survived by her younger brother Steve, and many cousins, nieces and nephews. In her last few months, one of the caregivers discovered that Louise enjoyed watching NASCAR racing and NFL football, which was completely unknown to the rest of the family. It does make sense though since Louise and Bob met at a football game, and brother Steve is a hotrod enthusiast from way back and still enjoys racing motorcycles as he approaches his 80th birthday.

In 1969 Bob received an assignment to work for Goodyear Thailand, and so the family moved to Bangkok where the boys went to high school, Louise taught high school science, and Bob managed the manufacturing of tires. After Thailand Bob was assigned to Northern Ireland and then South Africa. Louise and Bob lived together in those two places while the boys attended college. After Louise and Bob moved back to the States and retired, they did a variety of interesting and beneficial activities. Notably Louise earned her private pilot license and instrument rating for flying small airplanes, and they participated for several years in the church’s Kairos prison outreach program. In Kairos they prepared and served special meals to the inmates, and talked with them offering counsel to help them improve their lives and be ready to do well outside when they were released.

Louise was very musical and played piano (Beethoven, Mozart, Chopin et al.), flute and ukulele, popular due to Marilyn Monroe and Audrey Hepburn. When the boys reached an age to be interested in playing music, Louise enrolled them with a single mom piano teacher, in keeping with her lifelong support of motherhood and especially single mothers. She supported the March of Dimes and various women’s shelters throughout her life.

It was in science and education that Louise found her lifetime avocation, earning a Masters degree in Botany from University of Kansas and a teaching certificate from Kansas State Teachers College. She taught high school science for several decades, first in Oskaloosa Kansas, International School Bangkok, and ending at Bishop Flaget in Chillicothe Ohio. In South Africa where regulations prevented her from teaching with American credentials, she did various other education related activities including appearing on a television science show with Dr. Christiaan Barnard, inventor of human heart transplants.

Louise taught chemistry, biology, earth science and IPS (Introductory Physical Science) which was hands down her favorite subject. IPS introduced students to many basic physical properties of the world including length, area and volume; weight and mass; thermal expansion and contraction of solids, liquids and gases, among many other topics. Louise’s favorite lab experiment was the “black box” wherein every team of 3 or 4 students was given a closed cardboard box containing various physical objects, and by shaking, weighing and other interactions, students were to develop theories about the types of objects contained in the box, e.g. pencil vs. ball point pen, metal nuts and bolts vs. wooden shapes etc. One experiment involved discovering the empty space contained in sand by measuring the volume of sand and the volume of a certain amount of water, and then pouring the water into the sand and measuring the “lost” volume that comprises the empty spaces between the grains of sand. One year all of the students came up with a radically abnormal measure of the lost volume (typically 30 to 40%). Ever the scientist, Louise took the sample of sand under a microscope and discovered that the sand contained grains of a wide range of sizes, and so the smaller grains filled in what would have been the standard empty space to be filled by water in the normal sample where all sand grains are approximately the same size. At home, Louise applied these principles to educating the boys, e.g. the best way to dissolve all the granules in jello is by stirring, not in a circle but a figure 8, a trick she learned in her grad school biology lab. Her teaching led to Ken working at NASA, and Gary passing the final selection rounds to be on the Jeopardy show shortly before his death.

Many of Louise’s students went on to perform high level jobs in Business, Military, Government and Academia and generally credited Louise with teaching them analytical skills and critical thinking.

Louise had a wry and subtle sense of humor, but generally avoided telling jokes in keeping with her oft stated maxim “if you can’t say something nice, don’t say anything at all”, an expression of Robert Heinlein’s observation that much of what is considered humor is actually hurtful and negative. She did have a few gems that she told over the years like when the boys were in the final years of high school “Just when they get big enough to start being useful, they go off to college”, and as Chinese culture was making inroads into American culture in the 1960s and 1970s “Confucius say: spank little boy every day. You not know why but little boy knows why.” A good expression of her sophisticated wit is “What is the difference between Heaven and Hell? In Heaven the French are the cooks, the British are the police, the Italians are the lovers, the Swiss are the civil servants and the Germans are the engineers. In Hell, the British are the cooks, the French are the civil servants, the Swiss are the lovers, the Italians are the engineers and the Germans are the police.”

Louise liked musical theatre (popular in the 1960s and 1970s e.g. My Fair Lady, Camelot, Sound of Music, Mary Poppins, Oliver, Oklahoma, The Music Man, and the musical review Up With People (“If more people were for people, all people everywhere, there’d be a lot less people to worry about and a lot more people who care”). She also enjoyed cultural and political satire like the songs of Tom Lehrer and Allan Sherman, and watched the Smothers Brothers Comedy Hour with the family. Recently she liked watching Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert.

We will have a memorial for Louise at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Chillicothe, time and date to be announced later. The Lindsay family would like to thank National Church Residences who managed the care for Louise and Bob for the past several years, and especially all the caregivers, hospice and nursing staff, including Yvonne Beverly, Deb Bachor, Robin Brushart, Tammy Diaz, Sondra Dunham, Linda Rogers-Flores, Michelle Goode, McKayla Harrison, Michelle Hines, Pastor Aaron Hines, Tara Hollis, Alisha Jenkins, Marjorie McFarland, Rebekah McCarty, Sherry Mitchell, Amy Monday, Tangi Rider, Sarah Wicker, Amanda, Billy and Katie. Thanks are also due to St. Paul’s Church, Father Michael Ralph, Father Paul Daggett, Deacon Craig and Gary Haslop.

Where flies this feather

Where flies this feather
That is my mother’s soul
As she unfolds the journey
Into her next life?

Will she meet Jesus?
Yes of course.
And maybe the Mary’s,
Saints and Apostles.

Perhaps even Buddha,
The Little Prince
And other spirit guides
That she knew of or not
In this lifetime.

Wherever her path takes her
I’m sure it will be some place good.

Please send pictures (old and new), anecdotes, articles, stories, and tributes to isbeings at gmail dot com

Kazuhiko Wakugami ~ Class of 1984

Kazuhiko Wakugami ~ Class of 1984

Departed ~ 4/27/22

Barry Jien lovingly posted:
It saddens me to report that we have lost one of our members, Kazuhiko a few days ago in Thailand. I took this picture during our Pattaya trip in 1984.

D.O.B. 11/3/1966
Departed:. 4/27/2022
Cremated: 4/30/2022

Please send pictures (old and new), anecdotes, articles, stories, and tributes to isbeings at gmail dot com

Thomas Tommy Tom P. Mack ~ Class of 1973

Tom Mack ~ Class of 1973

Departed ~ 3/6/2022

Erin Mack, Tom’s daughter wrote:

This past Sunday, Dad passed away at home surrounded by family. He is finally at peace.

For those unaware of his story, Tommy was unexpectedly diagnosed with terminal pancreatic cancer in July. He faced his prognosis with courage, even choosing to undergo multiple rounds of chemo. He fought a long and hard battle up until the very end. We are all so very proud of him.

Mom encapsulated Dad so perfectly the other day when she said “Tommy was a force.” Dad was a force; he loved life and took every opportunity to live it fully.

Tommy will be buried at Arlington National Cemetary outside of Washington D.C. (date unknown).

In the meantime, Devon Mack and I are working diligently on securing the best plot there is (per dad’s requests, a plot on a hill with a view and a tree for shade) ❤️

Erin Mack is with Tom Mack

·


Dad will be buried with military honors at Arlington National Cemetery on July 6th at 3pm. Long before his cancer diagnosis, dad often spoke about how honored he felt to be buried at Arlington. This day will be incredibly special to us, as it was to him. We welcome anyone who would like to share it with us.

Following the funeral at Arlington, there will be a reception at a nearby location (details provided later).

For those interested in attending the reception after Arlington, we kindly ask that you message me or Devon Mack so we can book an appropriately sized space.

To those who have texted, called and sent cards to share their kind words and memories of dad over the past 5 weeks, we thank you ❤️

Please send pictures (old and new), anecdotes, articles, stories and tributes to isbeings at gmail dot com